Style, minimalism, and grief


A style diary.

First impression: Elizabeth Suzann Cecilia pants

Elizabeth Suzann Cecelia pants

And lo —

Elizabeth Suzann cecilias have arrived.

My first impression of these pants is they are cut slimmer than I expected in the calf, but very comfortable in the waist and elsewhere. They don't dig at all or create muffintop. The fabric is really nice and doesn't feel flimsy. The weave has a little sheen to it but not the the extent of a polyester.

These aren't pants you can really tuck much into though; despite the substantially heavyweight stretch cotton, they definitely cling and anything bulkier than a camisole will probably look bulge-y tucked in past the double-faced waistband (I think a bodysuit would actually work really well with these pants though). That's kind of OK though because they seem good for wearing shirts on top of, untucked (a cropped, swingy top works great too) —there's no complicated embellishment at the waist — no fly, no pockets, no belt loops to distract or add bulk. ES indicated they sourced a heavier invisible back zip on this updated version of the pants but even that doesn't add much bulk (I actually thought to myself "what a substantial feeling zipper" as I zipped them up). They just feel like high-quality pants.

 Cecilias pass the sit test — no weird bunching at the waist.

Cecilias pass the sit test — no weird bunching at the waist.

In contrast to ES canvas I tried with the new clyde pants, the cecilias stretch cotton is a silkier feeling material. It's the kind of fabric where the cat hair will want to stick to it like normal, but you can kind of swipe it off with your hands a few times and it's noticeably less cat-hairy. Much better choice than the canvas if you are thinking about getting black pants and you have light colored pets. So to fill the black pants hole in my wardrobe, the cecilias win.

The rise and waist are really comfortable when you pull the pants on and are standing up. After I had them on I discovered one of the cats had left a little turd on the floor in the bedroom so I was on my hands and knees with bleach cleaning that up. I hope I didn't get bleach on these!!! I think I'm good though, haha.

The pants are easy to move around in but I did note when I stood up I had to adjust the waist back into place. I'm wearing a 6-tall because I was feeling like I always needed to go with a tall in ES to get the higher rise (not necessarily to get the longer length), but I wonder with these if a 6-Regular would have been adequate because of the stretch material here. It might be the rise is on 6-tall is actually too tall! They are a really high rise, and that's saying a lot coming from me! 

And if I were in a showroom, I'd definitely try them in a 4 and a 4-tall too to compare. I like the snugness now but wonder if maybe they are going to stretch and be too big eventually, whereas I should have had them tight in a 4 at first and then stretch to how they are now? I just can't tell how the elastic in these is going to play out. Does anyone have experience with this? The quality construction indicates they would actually be a little challenging to take in in the waist should I want to do that later; the facing on the inside of the pants is sewn down and youd'd basically need to take the entire top of the pants apart to make them smaller the correct way (read: not just sewing a line up the side like I do on pants sometimes lol).

While they have generous stretch, the facing on the waistband keeps that area in a little stricter shape. It's a nice touch but does cause more fussing than you'd get out of an elastic waistband or sweatpants, especially after you've been sitting or lying down. But the flipside is they look a lot more professional than sweatpants.

And speaking of professional, I feel like a blazer or structured jacket in this material would be especially stunning, and just think — an ethical, sustainable, slow-fashion, minimal suit for those times you need a suit. I can imagine a cropped, open front silhouette - maybe collarless. Get on it Liz!

The reason I went for the cecilias is I wanted a slim back pant that could work for a more cool and casual look as well as a more professional one. The minimal styling on these means they lend themselves both ways. It's all about context.

I'm currently balled up on the loveseat with the laptop and find the cecilias comfortably unnoticed. I was sitting the same way yesterday but in my Rachel Comey lure pants and I consciously felt that the waist band was just a bit too snug for ultimate comfort in those pants in this position. Not every pant is going to be good for everything, which is why we often own multiple pants. :-)

So overall, I think these are a yes, but I'm still unsure on exact sizing. I measured them and came up with slightly different numbers than ES lists online for the 6-tall. I wish I could at least try a 6-regular for comparison on the rise since the regular rise is an inch shorter (and I do like the inseam length on these, they feel like regular pants and not cropped). My body measurements come in just between a 4 and a 6 on the ES chart, but I wouldn't want these any tighter in the calf than they are now. I think I'll reach out to ES and see what their thoughts are on stretching and how snug a fit I should be looking for.


Elizabeth Suzann / Cecilia Pants


Cecilia pants / 6-tall

  • Waist - 13 ⅜"
  • Hip - 18"
  • Rise - 12 ⅜"
  • Inseam - 30"

Measured flat by me.



Update 2/13/18

I ended up trading a local ES wearer for her 6-regulars. After wearing several more times, I decided I couldn't get over the tight calves in these pants and I sold on Poshmark. After having to keep tugging the bottom hem down whenever I stood up, I decided these were not the right fit for me. The rest of the pants fit great. I loved the waist and thigh fit. The fabric was awesome. There's so much potential. I'm holding out hope the pants get updated in the future with a legit wider calf so they are true cigarette pants and not just a poorly fitted skinny pant.

Revised review: 6.5/10. Fix the tiny calf and then we'll talk.